heatherlarson_writemix heatherlarson_writemix heatherlarson_writemix
heatherlarson_writemix heatherlarson_writemix
heatherlarson_writemix heatherlarson_writemix heatherlarson_writemix heatherlarson_writemix heatherlarson_writemix


articles
Back to Writing Samples : Back to Health Articles

All articles © Heather Larson / WriteMix.net. Duplication and redistribution strictly prohibited.

Health Articles
8 Foods That Give You Energy
(posted on MySilverAge.com)
By Heather Larson

 

Need help keeping up with your grandkids or tackling your bucket list? Try these high-energy foods for a boost.

It’s hard to feel like taking on the world—or even the laundry—when your energy is low. Even enjoyable activities, like playing with the grandkids, meeting a friend for lunch or working out may seem daunting when you’re drained. You might grab an energy drink or supplement to rev you up when you need a boost, but did you know by simply incorporating high-energy foods into your diet you can naturally lift your zest? Next time you’re feeling depleted, grab one of the following foods for an energy boost.

Dried Fruit

For a high-energy punch, snack on raisins and other dried fruits like cherries, plums, mangoes, blueberries or apricots.

“Dried fruit provides a big hit of fiber and flavor and, as an added health benefit, it wards off constipation,” says Kim Larson, registered dietitian and national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics.

The concentrated sugar in dried fruit feeds the brain its preferred fuel to keep cognitive functions and vitality levels high. You only need a small amount to boost your energy.

Popcorn

Popcorn falls into the whole-grain category, believe it or not. It’s quick, easy and (if you choose the fat-free variety) low in calories. The fiber and carbohydrates in popcorn can fill you up and give you the drive you need to feel your best, Larson says.

Oatmeal

This hot cereal is a slow-digesting carbohydrate, making it one of the best foods to eat first thing in the morning to get you revved and going, says Larson. The soluble fiber in oatmeal keeps blood sugar levels stable for hours at a time. That same fiber also slows absorption of calories so your body gets more fuel for a longer period of time.

Greek Yogurt

Plain Greek yogurt has no added sugar and offers twice the protein of regular yogurt. Dress it up with honey, dried fruit or fresh fruit for a dose of sweetness. The carbs in Greek yogurt give you energy while the protein helps reduce loss of muscle mass. It also gives you some of the vitamin D you need.

Almond Butter

One serving of almond butter (two tablespoons) contains healthy fats, fiber and protein to keep you full and boost your drive. Almond butter also has vitamin E that acts as an antioxidant to help decrease inflammation in the body, a condition sure to slow you down. This tasty treat also supplies you with calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium to keep your bones and heart strong.

Bananas

Zip open the peel and you have an instant source of inulin, a type of soluble fiber that is not absorbed. Inulin also acts as a prebiotic, promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. Bananas help with energy by providing vitamin B6 (for optimal magnesium absorption) and potassium to regulate blood pressure.

“Because the fiber isn’t absorbed, bananas help control weight, preventing those extra pounds that zap energy and make it harder to move,” Larson says. 

Edamame

Green soybeans, boiled or steamed in their pods, are a good source of magnesium. When you feel fatigued, that’s often a sign your body lacks enough magnesium.

“Magnesium is essential to convert food into energy and recent research says it also may help increase energy levels,” says Larson. “It’s important that you also get vitamin B6 in your diet as that determines how much magnesium is absorbed.”

Fatty Fish

Salmon, trout, mackerel and herring contain omega-3 fatty acids that have been shown to help prevent depression and cognitive decline.

“Your brain is made up of about 60 percent fatty acids, so these beneficial fats help protect, heal and nourish your brain cells, keeping the neurons healthy for better communication with each other,” Larson says.

 

top
Back to Writing Samples : Back to Health Articles